Birthright Stories

June 22, 2016

Dr Mary Gray is a scientist that devoted her twenties to unearthing maverick genes in rare genetic conditions. In fact, the former Birthright client starting making a name for herself back in her student days at the University of Otago, where Read More

June 3, 2016

Today, children grow up in families that are increasingly diverse, ranging from traditional families with two biological parents, blended families, one parent families, children raised by wider whanau, and shared parenting arrangements where Read More

June 3, 2016

The 2000s saw many changes in family types and make-up, including a steady rise in one-parent families, decreasing marriage rates and greater ethnic diversity, with around 1 in 5 New Zealand children born with two or more ethnicities.

In Read More

June 3, 2016

The 1990s began with one of the Government’s most radical reforms in the history of state housing: the removal of income-related rents and the establishment of a government accommodation supplement. For hundreds of state house tenants, the Read More

June 3, 2016

In his 1964 annual report, the President of Birthright Auckland had remarked: ‘It is a matter of increasing wonderment to us all that in a community and a welfare state such as ours there should be so many who need help” – twenty years later the Read More

June 3, 2016

The social and economic changes during the 1970s saw a significant rise in non-widowed, one parent families. In 1971, 5% of all households were one parent families, while births to unmarried mothers had peaked at 44.4 per 1000 women of Read More

June 3, 2016

The types of one-parent families within New Zealand expanded rapidly in the 1960s. Changing social attitudes saw the annual number of unmarried women raising their child in a sole parent situation rise by 80% between 1963 and 1967 while the Read More

June 3, 2016

1950s New Zealand was enjoying an economic boom after the Great Depression and the Second World War. The welfare system was well in place and developing, jobs were plentiful, the nuclear family was still regarded as the ‘ideal’ social grouping, Read More

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